Russian Towns – Vorotynsk http://vorotynsk.com/ Mon, 29 Aug 2022 06:16:55 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://vorotynsk.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-150x150.png Russian Towns – Vorotynsk http://vorotynsk.com/ 32 32 Russian-Ukrainian war: UN nuclear team “en route” to Zaporizhzhia, says IAEA chief – live | Ukraine https://vorotynsk.com/2022/08/29/russian-ukrainian-war-un-nuclear-team-en-route-to-zaporizhzhia-says-iaea-chief-live-ukraine/ Mon, 29 Aug 2022 05:17:00 +0000 https://vorotynsk.com/2022/08/29/russian-ukrainian-war-un-nuclear-team-en-route-to-zaporizhzhia-says-iaea-chief-live-ukraine/ Key events Show only key events Please enable JavaScript to use this feature Russian forces ‘rebuild’ Mariupol theater to cover up war crimesaccording to an adviser to the mayor of the city. Petr Andriushchenko said Moscow forces were rebuilding the theater under the guise of reconstruction with “historical value”. The occupiers are hiding their own […]]]>

Key events

Russian forces ‘rebuild’ Mariupol theater to cover up war crimesaccording to an adviser to the mayor of the city.

Petr Andriushchenko said Moscow forces were rebuilding the theater under the guise of reconstruction with “historical value”.

The occupiers are hiding their own war crime… They are in a hurry to eliminate all traces and evidence through “reconstruction”. Under the guise of “historical value”.

… The only historical value came when two bombs fell. And it is this historic value that the occupiers are now trying to hide.

Russian forces struck the theater in March, killing around 300 people who were using the building as a refuge.

Russia increases its mobilization reserves and plans to mobilize around 90,000 military personnelaccording to Ukrainian intelligence.

The representative of the Main Intelligence Directorate of the Ministry of Defense of Ukraine, Vadym Skibitsky, said in a statement on Sunday:

At the same time, different approaches are used: so-called volunteer battalions, and reserve battalions, battalions of the so-called “country combat army reserve” (BARS), which they now recruit from each military district in order to to replenish losses, increase their efforts and increase the number of the same group that can be used against our state.

According to Skibitsky, Russia faces major problems in equipping its armed forces.

Time is running out, they haven’t received a blitzkrieg. Will mobilizing more people in the Russian Federation help? Probably not, after all. Because the morale of soldiers, as they carry out combat operations, drops, first of all. Second, they are less and less willing to enter the ranks of the Soviet Union voluntarily. In addition, panic has set in among the population of the big cities, because no one just wants to go and serve in the armed forces, let alone go to war.

Russia strikes city where Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant is located, Ukraine says

Russian forces fired on Enerhodar, the city where the Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant is locatedaccording to the Ukrainian Armed Forces.

Russian forces shell residential areas of the city. Cars and homes of civilians are burning,” the military said alongside footage purportedly of the attack. published on his official Telegram account

In the footage, several cars can be seen engulfed in flames as firefighters rush to put out the blaze.

The Ukrainian president’s chief of staff, Volodymyr Zelenskiy, also appeared to confirm the reports on Sunday evening on his Telegram channel alongside a video of firefighters spraying burning cars.

“They provoke and try to blackmail the world,” chief of staff Andriy Yermak said.

Russian forces have shelled Ukrainian towns across the river from the plant in recent days, officials said.

Regional Governor Oleksandr Starukh said on Telegram on Sunday that Russian forces struck residential buildings in the main town of Zaporizhzhia, about two hours’ drive from the plant, and the town of Orikhiv further east.

The Ukrainian military reported the bombing of nine other towns in the region across the Dnipro River, while the Russian news agency quoted authorities as saying they had shot down a Ukrainian drone that was planning to attack the plant nuclear waste storage facility.

UN nuclear watchdog to visit Zaporizhzhia plant this week

The UN nuclear watchdog will visit Ukraine’s Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant this week, its director general confirmed.

international atomic energy agency (IAEA) Chief, Raphael Grossitweeted early this morning:

The day has come, the IAEA Support and Assistance Mission in Zaporizhzhia (ISAMZ) is now on its way. We must protect the safety and security of the largest nuclear facility in Ukraine and Europe. Proud to lead this mission which will be at ZNPP later this week.

The mission will assess any physical damage to the plant, determine the functionality of safety and security systems, assess personnel conditions and carry out urgent safeguard activities.

Summary and welcome

Hello and welcome to the Guardian’s live coverage of the war in Ukraine.

I’m Samantha Lock and I’ll bring you all the latest developments in a short time. Whether you’ve been following our coverage overnight or just passed by, here are the final lines.

UN nuclear watchdog to visit Ukraine Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant this week, confirmed its general manager. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) chief Rafael Grossi says ‘the day has come’ for a support mission to protect the safety and security of Europe’s largest nuclear facility and that officials will visit the site “later this week”.

Russian forces fired on Enerhodarthe city where the factory is located, late Sunday evening, according to the Ukrainian armed forces.

The strike comes later Volodymyr ZelenskyY, the Ukrainian president, held a meeting on Sunday with representatives of the Ukrainian defense and security sectors.

It’s 8am in Kyiv. Here is where we are:

  • Volodymyr Zelenskiy, President of Ukraine, held a meeting on Sunday with representatives of the Ukrainian defense and security sectors. “All the issues we looked at are important, but secret, I can’t go into detail,” he said. The meeting brought together the heads of the armed forces, intelligence agencies, the Ministry of Defense, the Ministry of Internal Affairs, the Ukrainian security service as well as other defense forces.

  • Russian artillery fired at Ukrainian towns across the river from the Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant, local officials said on Sunday. Regional Governor Oleksandr Starukh said Russian forces struck residential buildings in the main town of Zaporizhzhia and the town of Orikhiv further east. The Ukrainian army reported the bombardment of nine other towns in the region across the Dnieper from the plant.

  • UN nuclear watchdog awaits clearance from officials to visit plant “to help stabilize the nuclear safety and security situation”. Energoatom chief Petro Kotin told the Guardian that a visit by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) could take place before the end of the month, but Ukraine’s energy minister Lana Zerkal , told a local radio station that she was not convinced that Russia was negotiating in good faith.

  • The United States said that Russia does not want to recognize the serious radiological risk of the Ukrainian nuclear power plant in Zaporizhzhia, adding that this was why he had blocked the final draft of a nuclear non-proliferation treaty agreement. “Only the Russian Federation has decided to block consensus on a final document at the end of the Tenth Review Conference of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). Russia did so in order to block language that simply acknowledged the grave radiological risk at the Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant in Ukraine,” a statement from the US State Department said.

  • Concerns about the potential risk of radioactive leaks at the plant persist. Ukrainian and Russian authorities have issued new warnings about the risk of radioactive leaks, after bombings that the parties blame each other for. The Ukrainian energy operator warned that there were “risks of hydrogen leakage and spraying of radioactive substances”. Russia has ignored widespread international calls for the demilitarization of the region.

  • Ukrainians will likely experience their coldest winter in decades, said its gas chief, because the thermostats of its Soviet-era centralized heating systems have to be turned on later and turned off. Yurii Vitrenko, the head of state gas company Naftogaz, said indoor temperatures would be set at 17-18C, about four degrees cooler than normal, and he advised people to stock up on blankets and warm clothes when outside temperatures fall and beyond the winter average of -10C.

  • Germany is rebuilding gas stocks faster than expected despite drastic Russian supply cuts and should hit an early October target, the government said. Europe’s largest economy is heavily dependent on Russian gas and has rushed to bolster its reserves ahead of winter, crediting energy-saving measures in recent weeks and massive gas purchases from other suppliers .

  • EU foreign ministers are expected to suspend Russian tourist visa facilitation next week. The EU decision is not an outright ban, but would make obtaining travel documents much more complicated and expensive. EU foreign policy chief Josep Borrell said a ban would lack the necessary backing. “I don’t think cutting relations with the Russian civilian population will help and I don’t think this idea will get the required unanimity,” he told Austrian television ORF on Sunday.

An excavator demolishes ruined buildings in Mariupol. Photography: AFP/Getty Images

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Russo-Ukrainian War: List of Key Events, Day 185 | Russo-Ukrainian War https://vorotynsk.com/2022/08/27/russo-ukrainian-war-list-of-key-events-day-185-russo-ukrainian-war/ Sat, 27 Aug 2022 07:03:04 +0000 https://vorotynsk.com/2022/08/27/russo-ukrainian-war-list-of-key-events-day-185-russo-ukrainian-war/ As the Russo-Ukrainian War enters its 185th day, we take a look at the major developments. Here are the highlights of Saturday, August 27. Struggle On Friday evening, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy said the situation at the Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant remained “very risky” after two of its six reactors were reconnected to the grid […]]]>

As the Russo-Ukrainian War enters its 185th day, we take a look at the major developments.

Here are the highlights of Saturday, August 27.

Struggle

  • On Friday evening, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy said the situation at the Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant remained “very risky” after two of its six reactors were reconnected to the grid after the bombings.
  • Ukraine’s president has urged the world to act much faster to force Russian troops to evacuate Europe’s largest nuclear power plant after the site was cut off from power for hours in an incident he says , risked provoking an international radioactive disaster.
  • Ukraine plans to increase the number of districts on the war front lines where civilian evacuations will be mandatory, as these areas could be occupied and face central heating problems this winter, the deputy said on Friday. Prime Minister.
  • Russia has likely stepped up its attacks along the Donetsk sector in the Donbass region over the past five days in a bid to suck in Ukrainian troops and thwart a counterattack, according to the UK Defense Ministry.
  • The Ukrainian military said its forces repelled Russian assaults on the towns of Bakhmut and Soledar in the eastern region of Donetsk and hit munitions depots and enemy personnel in the southern region of Kherson.
  • Ukrainian forces used a US-supplied HIMARS multiple rocket launcher to fire about 10 rockets at the town of Kadiivka in the eastern Donbass region before dawn on Friday, according to dissident pro-Moscow officials in Luhansk, quoted by Russian news agency TASS.
  • Reuters was unable to verify battlefield reports from either side.

Diplomacy

  • Russia on Friday night blocked an agreement on the outcome document of a four-week review of the UN treaty considered a cornerstone of nuclear disarmament that criticized its military takeover of the Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant, an act which raised fears of a nuclear accident.
  • The White House said Thursday that Russia should agree to a demilitarized zone around the nuclear plant and allow the world’s nuclear body, the International Atomic Energy Agency, to visit as soon as possible to verify the safety and system security.
  • Turkey said Sweden and Finland renewed their commitment to fight “terrorism” in the first meeting to discuss Ankara’s conditions for accepting their bid for NATO membership. The two Nordic countries broke with a decades-long military non-alignment and asked to join NATO after Russia invaded Ukraine in February.
  • Ukraine has now exported one million tonnes of agricultural products from its Black Sea ports under a grain deal brokered by Turkey and the United Nations, President Zelenskyy said on Friday.
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Russian attack kills 25 civilians on Ukraine’s Independence Day, Kyiv says https://vorotynsk.com/2022/08/25/russian-attack-kills-25-civilians-on-ukraines-independence-day-kyiv-says/ Thu, 25 Aug 2022 08:45:00 +0000 https://vorotynsk.com/2022/08/25/russian-attack-kills-25-civilians-on-ukraines-independence-day-kyiv-says/ Two strikes in the small eastern town of Chaplyne, official says 25 dead at station, passenger train set on fire Rockets hit area north of Kyiv, no casualties reported The August 24 holiday marked the 1991 independence from Soviet rule KYIV, Aug 25 (Reuters) – A Russian attack killed 25 civilians when missiles hit a […]]]>
  • Two strikes in the small eastern town of Chaplyne, official says
  • 25 dead at station, passenger train set on fire
  • Rockets hit area north of Kyiv, no casualties reported
  • The August 24 holiday marked the 1991 independence from Soviet rule

KYIV, Aug 25 (Reuters) – A Russian attack killed 25 civilians when missiles hit a train station and residential area in eastern Ukraine, officials in the capital Kyiv said, as the country marked the Independence Day under heavy bombardment.

The death toll rose from an initially reported 22 after three more bodies were found in the rubble of the town of Chaplyne at the end of rescue operations, Ukrainian presidential aide Kyrylo Tymoshenko said on Thursday.

The Vyshgorod region, directly north of Kyiv, was also attacked with rockets, but no casualties were reported, regional official Olexiy Kuleba said on the Telegram channel.

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Missile strikes and artillery shelling of frontline cities, such as Kharkiv, Mykolaiv, Nikopol and Dnipro, followed President Volodymyr Zelenskiy’s warnings of the risk of “repugnant Russian provocations” ahead of the 31st anniversary of the independence from the Moscow-dominated Soviet regime.

August 24 also marked six months since Russian forces invaded Ukraine, sparking the most devastating conflict in Europe since World War II.

As rescue operations wrapped up in Chaplyne, residents of this small town, located about 145 km (90 miles) west of Russian-occupied Donetsk, wept for their loved ones amid the rubble of their homes. destroyed.

Local resident Sergiy lost his 11-year-old son in the strike. “We looked for him out there in the ruins, and he was lying here. Nobody knew he was here. Nobody knew,” he said, crouching down beside her covered body.

The Russian Defense Ministry had no immediate comment on the attack. Speaking in Uzbekistan, Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu repeated that Moscow had deliberately slowed down what he calls a “special military operation” in Ukraine to avoid civilian casualties. Read more

Russia denies targeting civilians. He also said that the railway infrastructure is a legitimate target since it is used to supply Ukraine with Western weapons.

Commenting on the attack, US Secretary of State Antony Blinken said on Twitter: “The Russian missile strike on a train station full of civilians in Ukraine fits a pattern of atrocities. We will continue, with partners around the world, to support Ukraine and hold Russian officials to account.”

Wednesday’s public holiday celebrations were canceled but many Ukrainians marked the occasion by wearing embroidered shirts typical of the national costume.

Ukraine declared independence from the disintegrating Soviet Union in August 1991 and its people voted overwhelmingly for independence in a referendum in December.

Air raid sirens sounded at least seven times in Kyiv during the day, although there were no attacks. Ukrainian authorities said air raid warnings were sounded 189 times across the country on Wednesday, more than at any other time in the six-month conflict.

Zelenskiy and his wife, Olena, joined religious leaders for a service in Kyiv’s 11th-century Saint Sophia Cathedral and laid flowers in front of a memorial to fallen soldiers.

The 44-year-old leader said Ukraine would take back Russian-occupied areas in eastern Ukraine and the Crimean Peninsula, which Russia annexed in 2014.

AWAY FROM THE FRONT LINES

Ukrainian forces shot down a Russian drone in the Vinnytsia region while Russian missiles landed in the Khmelnytskyi region, regional authorities said, both west of Kyiv and hundreds of kilometers from the lines of forehead. No damage or casualties were reported.

Citing local sources, public broadcaster Suspilne TV reported early Thursday of explosions near the Antonivsky Bridge over the Dnipro River in the southern Kherson region, a major supply route for Russian troops in the region.

The Southern Ukrainian Military Command also reported missile strikes on the Nova Kakhovka dam at the crossing of the Dnipro River, another important Russian supply line in the Kherson region.

Reuters could not verify the battlefield accounts.

At a UN Security Council session on Wednesday, Russian Ambassador Vassily Nebenzia reiterated Moscow’s reasons for its actions, saying its goal was to “denazify and demilitarize ‘Ukraine to eliminate threats’.” obvious” to Russia’s security.

Moscow’s position has been rejected by Ukraine and the West as a baseless pretext for a war of imperialist conquest.

US President Joe Biden on Wednesday announced nearly $3 billion for the purchase of arms and equipment for Ukraine from Washington, bringing his administration’s total commitment to military aid to more than 13 .5 billion dollars.

Russia has made little progress in recent months after its troops were pushed back from Kyiv in the first weeks of the war.

Ukraine’s top military intelligence official Kyrylo Budanov said on Wednesday that the Russian offensive was slowing down due to low morale and physical fatigue in its ranks, and Moscow’s “depleted” resource base. Read more

Russian forces have seized areas in the south, including those on the Black Sea and Sea of ​​Azov coasts and large swathes of Luhansk and Donetsk provinces that make up the eastern Donbass region.

The war has killed thousands of civilians, forced more than a third of Ukraine’s 41 million people from their homes, left cities in ruins and shaken the global economy, creating shortages of essential food grains and driving up prices Energy.

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Reports from Reuters offices; Written by Cynthia Osterman and Tomasz Janowski; Editing by Lincoln Feast and Gareth Jones

Our standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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‘War support is dwindling in Russia’ and FSB ‘should stage series of terror attacks in Russian cities’ – London Business News https://vorotynsk.com/2022/08/23/war-support-is-dwindling-in-russia-and-fsb-should-stage-series-of-terror-attacks-in-russian-cities-london-business-news/ Tue, 23 Aug 2022 14:32:57 +0000 https://vorotynsk.com/2022/08/23/war-support-is-dwindling-in-russia-and-fsb-should-stage-series-of-terror-attacks-in-russian-cities-london-business-news/ Mass casualties among Russia’s civilian population are also expected, National Security and Defense Council (NSDC) Secretary Oleksiy Danilov said. There are fears Vladimir Putin’s top generals could also be targeted for assassination by rogue FSB spy agents amid the car bomb that blew up Darya Dugin which was actually intended for her father Alaexander, to […]]]>

Mass casualties among Russia’s civilian population are also expected, National Security and Defense Council (NSDC) Secretary Oleksiy Danilov said.

There are fears Vladimir Putin’s top generals could also be targeted for assassination by rogue FSB spy agents amid the car bomb that blew up Darya Dugin which was actually intended for her father Alaexander, to destabilize the the Russian leader’s grip on power.

The first victim was the daughter of Russian philosopher and propagandist Alexander Dugin while Daria Dugin was blown up in a car bomb.

Learn more about the Russian-Ukrainian war:

The car that belonged to Russian propagandist Dugin exploded in the Moscow region near the village of Bolshye Vyazemy.

Dugin’s daughter was in the car, who was killed instantly, the propagandist himself, was hospitalized with a heart attack after his murder.

Putin’s inner circle is now on high alert as they believe a coup has already begun to overthrow the Russian leader.

Danilov said: “Support for the war is down in Russia.

“The Kremlin needs public mobilization. The FSB is expected to stage a series of terrorist attacks in Russian cities with heavy civilian casualties.

“Dugina is the first in the row. Unlike Russia, Ukraine is not at war with civilians.

Two days later, the FSB announced Daria’s murder had been solved and charged Ukrainian Natalia Vovk with her involvement, who arrived in Russia on July 23 with her 12-year-old daughter.

They reported that Vovk would be listed as part of the Azov regiment and they found his Ukrainian identity card.

The Azov regiment said that Vovk had nothing to do with the regiment, the terrorist attack itself is the preparation of a “court” on Ukrainian prisoners of war who will appear in metal cages for the ” to hold onto”.

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Russian missiles hit Ukraine’s Odessa region as war approaches six months https://vorotynsk.com/2022/08/21/russian-missiles-hit-ukraines-odessa-region-as-war-approaches-six-months/ Sun, 21 Aug 2022 14:08:00 +0000 https://vorotynsk.com/2022/08/21/russian-missiles-hit-ukraines-odessa-region-as-war-approaches-six-months/ Russia could be doing something ‘particularly ugly’, says Ukraine Ukraine Independence Day marks six months since invasion Missiles hit Ukraine’s Odessa region New shelling reported near Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant Russian nationalist’s daughter killed in car bombing Aug 21 (Reuters) – Artillery shells fell on a town near Europe’s largest nuclear power plant overnight and […]]]>
  • Russia could be doing something ‘particularly ugly’, says Ukraine
  • Ukraine Independence Day marks six months since invasion
  • Missiles hit Ukraine’s Odessa region
  • New shelling reported near Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant
  • Russian nationalist’s daughter killed in car bombing

Aug 21 (Reuters) – Artillery shells fell on a town near Europe’s largest nuclear power plant overnight and Russian missiles hit targets near Odessa, a Ukrainian Black Sea port and a grain export center, as the war moved towards its six-month milestone on Wednesday.

August 24 will also mark 31 years of Ukraine’s independence from Soviet rule, and President Volodymyr Zelenskiy in an overnight video address called for vigilance, saying Moscow might try “something particularly ugly”.

Russian authorities said on Sunday they were investigating a suspected car bombing outside Moscow that killed the daughter of Alexander Dugin, an ultra-nationalist Russian ideologue who advocates absorbing Ukraine into Russia. Read more

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While investigators said they were considering “all versions” to determine who was responsible, the Russian Foreign Ministry speculated there might be a link to Ukraine, which the adviser to Zelenskiy quickly dismissed.

“Ukraine, of course, has nothing to do with it because we are not a criminal state, like the Russian Federation, and moreover we are not a terrorist state,” Mykhailo Podolyak told the Ukrainian television, suggesting that the incident was a “Karmic”. reward for supporters of the invasion of Moscow.

As Ukraine prepared to mark its Independence Day, embroiled in a war that destroyed towns and villages, killed thousands and forced millions to flee, military and regional officials reported new Russian strikes on targets in the east and south of the country.

Of particular concern is the bombardment of Nikopol, a town across the Dnipro River from Zaporizhzhia, the largest nuclear power plant in Ukraine and Europe. He has been held by Russian forces since March.

Nikopol was shelled five times overnight, regional governor Valentyn Reznichenko wrote on Telegram. He said 25 artillery shells hit the town, causing a fire in industrial premises and knocking out electricity to 3,000 residents.

Fighting near Zaporizhzia and Saturday’s missile strike on the southern Ukrainian town of Voznesensk, not far from Ukraine’s second-largest atomic power plant, raised fears of a nuclear accident.

CRUISE MISSILE STRIKES

Local authorities also reported nightly missile attacks in the Odessa region, home to Black Sea ports key to a UN-brokered plan to help Ukraine’s agricultural exports, essential for the world’s food supply, to reach global markets again. Read more

Five Russian Kalibr cruise missiles were fired from the Black Sea at the region overnight, the regional administration’s spokesman said, citing information from the Southern Military Command. Two were shot down by Ukrainian air defenses while three hit agricultural targets, but there were no casualties.

Russia said on Sunday the missiles destroyed an ammunition depot containing missiles for US-made HIMARS rockets, while Kyiv said an attic was hit.

There have been no new reports of incidents in Crimea, the Black Sea peninsula that Russia annexed from Ukraine in 2014, after a series of explosions made headlines in recent times. weeks.

In his speech, Zelenskiy indirectly referred to the explosions, for which Ukraine did not claim responsibility, but analysts said at least some were made possible by new equipment used by its forces.

“You can literally smell Crimea in the air this year, that the occupation there is only temporary and Ukraine is coming back,” Zelenskiy said.

In the latest incident, a drone attack on the headquarters of Russia’s Black Sea Fleet was foiled on Saturday morning, according to a Telegram message from Mikhail Razvozhayev, the Russian-appointed governor of Crimea, who is not acknowledged. by the West.

In a daily Facebook update, the Ukrainian General Staff also reported several attempted Russian assaults over the past 24 hours in Donbass, the eastern region partially controlled by pro-Moscow separatists that has been a target. key to the Russian campaign in recent months.

In the south, Russian forces successfully carried out an assault on the village of Blahodatne, on the border between Kherson and Mykolaiv regions, he added. The city of Mykolaiv was hit by several S-300 missiles early on Sunday, regional governor Vitaliy Kim said on Telegram.

The Russian Defense Ministry said its forces destroyed two M777 howitzers in combat position in the Kherson region and a fuel depot in the Zaporizhzhia region.

Reuters was unable to independently verify the battlefield reports.

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Reporting by Ron Popeski and Natalia Zinets; Written by Tomasz Janowski; Editing by Nick Macfie and Gareth Jones

Our standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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2 Russian villages evacuated after the fire of an ammunition depot https://vorotynsk.com/2022/08/19/2-russian-villages-evacuated-after-the-fire-of-an-ammunition-depot/ Fri, 19 Aug 2022 14:56:41 +0000 https://vorotynsk.com/2022/08/19/2-russian-villages-evacuated-after-the-fire-of-an-ammunition-depot/ Kyiv, Ukraine — A fire at an ammunition depot near the Russian village of Timonovo prompted the evacuation of two villages in Russia’s Belgorod region on Ukraine’s northeastern border, an official said on Friday. The fire was the latest in a series of destructive incidents on Russian-occupied territory in Ukraine or inside Russia itself. About […]]]>

Kyiv, Ukraine — A fire at an ammunition depot near the Russian village of Timonovo prompted the evacuation of two villages in Russia’s Belgorod region on Ukraine’s northeastern border, an official said on Friday. The fire was the latest in a series of destructive incidents on Russian-occupied territory in Ukraine or inside Russia itself.

About 1,100 people reside in the villages of Timonovo and Soloti, about 25 kilometers from the Ukrainian border. The fire did not cause any casualties on Thursday evening, Belgorod regional governor Vyacheslav Gladkov said.

The blaze came days after another ammunition dump exploded on the Crimean Peninsula, a Russian-occupied territory on the Black Sea that was annexed by Moscow in 2014.

Last week, nine Russian warplanes were reportedly destroyed at an air base in Crimea, demonstrating both Russian vulnerability and Ukrainian ability to strike deep behind enemy lines. Ukrainian authorities have ceased to publicly claim responsibility.

But President Volodymyr Zelenskyy has hinted at Ukrainian attacks behind enemy lines after explosions in Crimea, which Russia has blamed on “sabotage”.

Russian Deputy Foreign Minister Sergei Ryabkov said in a televised address on Friday that statements by Ukrainian officials regarding strike facilities in Crimea mark “an escalation of the conflict openly encouraged by the United States and its allies in the ‘NATO’.

Ryabkov said Russian officials had warned the United States against such actions in phone calls with high-level members of the Biden administration, adding that the “deep and open involvement of the United States” in the war in Ukraine “effectively puts the United States on the verge of becoming a party to the conflict.“

“We don’t want escalation,” Ryabkov said. “We would like to avoid a situation where the United States becomes a party to the conflict, but so far we have not seen their willingness to consider these warnings deeply and seriously.”

Despite the latest incidents, a Western official said the war was at an “almost operational standstill”, with neither side in a position to launch major offensives.

“The whole tempo of the campaign has slowed, in part because both sides have become more aware that this is a marathon and not a sprint and that spend rates and ammunition conservation are important,” said an official who spoke on condition of anonymity because he is not authorized to discuss intelligence matters publicly.

Meanwhile, Kyiv and Moscow have continued to accuse each other of bombing Europe’s largest nuclear power plant, stoking international fears of a disaster on the continent.

The Kremlin said on Friday that Russian President Vladimir Putin had told his French counterpart Emmanuel Macron in their first telephone conversation since May 28 that the Ukrainian bombardment around the Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant “raised the threat of a large-scale disaster. scale that could lead to radioactive contamination of vast territories”. .”

The Zaporizhzhia nuclear facility in southern Ukraine was taken over by Russian forces shortly after the February 24 invasion began. Ukraine has accused Russia of stockpiling troops and weapons at the plant and using its land to launch strikes against Ukrainian-held territory. Ukrainian officials and military analysts say Moscow forces cynically used the plant as a shield, knowing the Ukrainians would be reluctant to retaliate.

Russia denied the charges and, in turn, accused Ukrainian forces of repeatedly bombing the plant.

The French presidency said in a statement that Macron “highlighted his concerns” about the situation at the Zaporizhzhia plant and expressed his support for the deployment of an International Atomic Energy Agency mission to the site “as soon as as possible”.

Putin accepted the deployment of the mission under the conditions discussed, according to the French press release. The Kremlin said that “the Russian side reaffirmed its readiness to offer the necessary assistance to the agency’s experts.”

Yevgeny Balitsky, the head of the Moscow-backed temporary administration for the Russian-controlled part of the Zaporizhzhia region, said on Friday that an IAEA mission could approach the plant from Ukrainian-held territory, a change in the position of Moscow which had previously suggested that the mission should go to the Crimean factory.

“I think they can also come from the Ukraine side,” Balitsky said in televised remarks. “We can get them safely to the factory and show where the fire is coming from and who is shooting.”

Mikhail Ulyanov, Russia’s envoy to international organizations in Vienna where the IAEA is based, said he thought a visit by the agency could realistically take place in early September.

After a Thursday visit to Ukraine, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said Zelenskyy had asked him to ensure that Russia removes weapons stored at the factory as an “important step for world peace”.

“Zelenskyy asked us for this in particular: that Russia remove all mines and similar (weapons) there and that the issue quickly cease to be scary. Because it is a threat,” Erdogan said.

Erdogan, whose country has close ties with Ukraine and Russia, said he would discuss the issue with Russian President Vladimir Putin, saying “Russia must do its part in this regard.”

Turkey’s president made the comments to a group of Turkish journalists upon returning from a visit with Zelenskyy and UN Secretary-General António Guterres to Ukraine on Thursday evening. His comments were reported on Friday by Turkey’s state-run Anadolu agency and other media.

At the meeting in the western city of Lviv, far from the frontlines, leaders discussed expanding prisoner-of-war exchanges and visiting UN atomic energy experts to help secure the nuclear plant.

IN OTHER DEVELOPMENTS:

– UN Secretary-General António Guterres visited a port in the Ukrainian coastal city of Odessa, where he hailed ongoing efforts to maintain a maritime corridor on the Black Sea allowing the export of vital Ukrainian grain . Guterres said 25 ships have left Odessa and other Ukrainian ports since Russia and Ukraine signed a four-month grain export deal in July. These ships have carried more than 600,000 tonnes of grain and other foodstuffs like wheat, corn, sunflower oil and soybeans, António Guterres said, adding that getting more food is crucial and fertilizers from Ukraine and Russia to further calm global commodity markets and lower prices. . Gutteres also called for unhindered access to global markets for Russian food and fertilizers, which are not subject to sanctions. “Without fertilizer in 2022, there may not be enough food in 2023,” he said.

— At least five people were killed and 10 others injured by the Russian shelling of towns and villages in the eastern region of Donetsk, according to regional authorities. The Russian shelling of the city of Kharkiv also killed at least one civilian on Friday morning. Russian missiles again hit port facilities and a university building in the southern port city of Mykolaiv.

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Jill Lawless in London contributed.

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Follow AP coverage of the war at https://apnews.com/hub/russia-ukraine

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Mass burials still underway in Bucha more than four months after Russians massacred civilians https://vorotynsk.com/2022/08/17/mass-burials-still-underway-in-bucha-more-than-four-months-after-russians-massacred-civilians/ Wed, 17 Aug 2022 23:20:37 +0000 https://vorotynsk.com/2022/08/17/mass-burials-still-underway-in-bucha-more-than-four-months-after-russians-massacred-civilians/ Burial ceremonies for unidentified victims continue in the Ukrainian town of Bucha, more than four months after mass graves were discovered after Russian troops massacred innocent civilians. On Wednesday, poignant images emerged from such a ceremony in which a solemn Orthodox priest presided over a sea of ​​fresh graves at a huge cemetery in the […]]]>

Burial ceremonies for unidentified victims continue in the Ukrainian town of Bucha, more than four months after mass graves were discovered after Russian troops massacred innocent civilians.

On Wednesday, poignant images emerged from such a ceremony in which a solemn Orthodox priest presided over a sea of ​​fresh graves at a huge cemetery in the city just 24 km north of Kyiv city center.

Dozens of brightly colored coffins were dragged out of a loading van and painstakingly lowered one by one into the ground before large wooden crosses were driven into the earth to adorn the final resting places of the victims.

City authorities say 458 bodies have been found in the Bucha area since the end of the 33-day Russian occupation of the town in early April, with more corpses still being discovered.

Among the victims are 12 children, who in most cases were executed alongside both parents.

A total of 21 people, not all of whom could be identified, were buried in Wednesday’s ceremony alone.

Orthodox priest Andrii Halavin holds a funeral service for 21 unidentified people killed by Russian troops during a mass burial ceremony in the town of Bucha near Kyiv, Ukraine on August 17, 2022

Workers unload empty coffins as they prepare to prepare the dead for their burial ceremony

Workers unload empty coffins as they prepare to prepare the dead for their burial ceremony

A worker screws up a plaque with the number of an unidentified person killed by Russian troops during a mass burial ceremony in the town of Bucha near Kyiv, Ukraine, August 17, 2022

A worker screws up a plaque with the number of an unidentified person killed by Russian troops during a mass burial ceremony in the town of Bucha near Kyiv, Ukraine, August 17, 2022

Municipal workers bury unidentified civilians who were killed by the Russian army, during the Russian occupation of the town of Bucha

Municipal workers bury unidentified civilians who were killed by the Russian army, during the Russian occupation of the town of Bucha

After all the coffins were filled and arranged throughout the burial site, city workers painstakingly lowered them one by one to their respective resting places as the priest looked on.

After all the coffins were filled and arranged throughout the burial site, city workers painstakingly lowered them one by one to their respective resting places as the priest looked on.

A worker places a cross on the grave of an unidentified person killed in the Bucha district at the time of the Russian occupation, during the burial at a cemetery in Bucha, northwest of Kyiv, Ukraine, on 17 August 2022

A worker places a cross on the grave of an unidentified person killed in the Bucha district at the time of the Russian occupation, during the burial at a cemetery in Bucha, northwest of Kyiv, Ukraine, on 17 August 2022

Father Andrii reads a prayer and blesses the grave of an unidentified civilian.  Each coffin is buried with a serial number - their only distinguishing feature

Father Andrii reads a prayer and blesses the grave of an unidentified civilian. Each coffin is buried with a serial number – their only distinguishing feature

Former United Nations Secretary-General Ban-Ki Moon visited a burial site in Bucha on Tuesday and called on the world to honor the masses of civilians killed by Putin’s soldiers as they retreated.

“It’s hard to express my feelings. It’s a horrible atrocity,’ Ban said as he saw the graveyard behind the Church of St. Andrew the Apostle, which was made famous in April when heartbreaking footage emerged from corpses lying in ditches as the golden domes of the church shone in the background.

“It is a crime against humanity and (those responsible) should be held accountable.

“All those killed here for no reason should be fully honored and commemorated in the history of mankind,” he concluded.

The former UN leader visited Ukraine as part of an international peace initiative known as The Elders, which former South African President Nelson Mandela founded in 2007.

Ban was joined by former Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos, a Nobel Peace Prize laureate like the late Mandela.

Santos also called the massacre of Ukrainian civilians a crime against humanity.

“The whole world should be very aware of what is happening and be able to support the people of Ukraine in their efforts to win their peace and freedom,” the former president said on Tuesday.

After touring the church yard and mass grave site, the couple were taken to see a photography exhibit inside the building with scenes from the aftermath of the intense fighting in Bucha in late February and March.

Former UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon, center, and former Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos, right, speak to Father Andrii during their visit to Bucha near Kyiv, Ukraine, on Tuesday, August 16, 2022. Andrii on Wednesday presided over the burials of 21 unidentified people killed in the Russian massacre

Former UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon, center, and former Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos, right, speak to Father Andrii during their visit to Bucha near Kyiv, Ukraine, on Tuesday, August 16, 2022. Andrii on Wednesday presided over the burials of 21 unidentified people killed in the Russian massacre

Former UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon, center, and former Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos, left, view images of mass graves at an exhibit in the church during their visit to Bucha near Kyiv, Ukraine on Tuesday August 16.  2022

Former UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon, center, and former Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos, left, view images of mass graves at an exhibit in the church during their visit to Bucha near Kyiv, Ukraine on Tuesday August 16. 2022

Former UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, center, and former Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos, center right, walk during their visit to Bucha near Kyiv, Ukraine, Tuesday August 16 2022

Former UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, center, and former Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos, center right, walk during their visit to Bucha near Kyiv, Ukraine, Tuesday August 16 2022

Orthodox priest Andrii Halavin leads a funeral service for 21 unidentified people killed by Russian troops

Orthodox priest Andrii Halavin leads a funeral service for 21 unidentified people killed by Russian troops

Coffins and graves are seen in a cemetery during a mass burial ceremony for 21 unidentified people killed by Russian troops in the town of Bucha near Kyiv, Ukraine August 17, 2022

Coffins and graves are seen in a cemetery during a mass burial ceremony for 21 unidentified people killed by Russian troops in the town of Bucha near Kyiv, Ukraine August 17, 2022

Excavators were used to move large amounts of earth to make way for new graves

Excavators were used to move large amounts of earth to make way for new graves

The massacres of civilians in Bucha have become a symbol of the brutality of the Russian war in Ukraine.

They were executed as Putin’s troops launched a failed effort to capture the Ukrainian capital after it invaded the country on February 24.

After weeks of failed attempts to break through Kyiv, Russian troops withdrew from their positions north of the capital in late March, leaving Ukrainian authorities with a harrowing discovery.

Ukrainian officials said 116 bodies were found in a mass grave near the Church of St. Andrew the Apostle in the first week of April.

Likewise, haunting discoveries have been made in small towns north and northwest of Kyiv.

Each unidentified victim buried in these mass graves is given a serial number to keep track of the ever-increasing death toll.

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Ukraine targets Russian soldiers accused of threatening nuclear power plant https://vorotynsk.com/2022/08/14/ukraine-targets-russian-soldiers-accused-of-threatening-nuclear-power-plant/ Sun, 14 Aug 2022 15:41:00 +0000 https://vorotynsk.com/2022/08/14/ukraine-targets-russian-soldiers-accused-of-threatening-nuclear-power-plant/ Russians threatening Zaporizhzhia are “targets” -Zelenskiy A humanitarian cargo must head for Ethiopia KYIV, Aug 14 (Reuters) – Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy has warned Russian soldiers who fire on Europe’s largest nuclear power plant or use it as a base for firing that they will become a “special target” for Ukrainian forces . UN Secretary-General […]]]>
  • Russians threatening Zaporizhzhia are “targets” -Zelenskiy
  • A humanitarian cargo must head for Ethiopia

KYIV, Aug 14 (Reuters) – Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy has warned Russian soldiers who fire on Europe’s largest nuclear power plant or use it as a base for firing that they will become a “special target” for Ukrainian forces .

UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres has called for the creation of a demilitarized zone at the factory in Zaporizhzhia, southern Ukraine, amid fears of a nuclear disaster following renewed bombings recent days, for which Russia and Ukraine blame each other.

Zelenskiy, who gave no details, reiterated that he viewed Russia using the plant, which it captured early in the war but is still run by Ukrainians, as nuclear blackmail.

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“Every Russian soldier who either shoots at the factory, or shoots using the factory as cover, must understand that he becomes a special target for our intelligence agents, for our special services, for our army,” he said. he said Saturday evening in an address. .

The Zaporizhzhia plant dominates the southern bank of a vast reservoir on the Dnipro River. Ukrainian forces controlling towns and cities on the opposite bank came under intense Russian bombardment. Read more

Ukrainian presidential adviser Mykhailo Podolyak accused Russia of “hitting the part of the nuclear power plant where the energy that supplies southern Ukraine is generated”.

“The goal is to disconnect us from (the factory) and blame the Ukrainian military for this,” Podolyak wrote on Twitter.

A foreman who worked at the plant was killed by Russian shelling on Sunday while walking his dog near his home in the town of Enerhodar, Ukraine’s state-owned nuclear company Energoatom said.

Russian-installed local official Vladimir Rogov wrote on Telegram that Ukrainian forces shelled the town and were responsible for the man’s death.

The International Atomic Energy Agency, which is seeking to inspect the plant, has warned of a nuclear disaster unless the fighting stops. Nuclear experts fear the fighting could damage the plant’s spent fuel pools or reactors.

GRAIN VESSELS

As the fighting continued, more ships carrying Ukrainian grain left or prepared to leave as part of a late-July deal to ease a global food crisis.

A shipment bound for Ethiopia, the first since Russia’s invasion of Ukraine, is set to leave in the coming days, while sources said the first grain ship to leave Ukraine in framework of a UN agreement was approaching Syria. Read more

“The world needs food from Ukraine. This is the start of what we hope will be normal operations for the world’s starving people,” Marianne Ward, deputy director of the World Food Programme, told reporters. The relief agency purchased more than 800,000 tonnes of grain from Ukraine last year.

Kyiv has said for weeks that it is planning a counteroffensive to retake Zaporizhzhia and neighboring Kherson provinces, most of the territory seized by Russia after its Feb. 24 invasion and still in Russian hands.

Russia’s priority over the past week has likely been to reorient its units to bolster its campaign in southern Ukraine, British military intelligence said on Sunday.

Russian-backed forces from the self-declared Donetsk People’s Republic in the eastern Donbass region continued their assault north of the city of Donetsk, the British Ministry of Defense said in its daily intelligence bulletin on Twitter.

The Ukrainian military command said on Sunday morning that Russian soldiers had continued, without success, to attack Ukrainian positions near Avdiivka, which since 2014 has become one of the outposts of Ukrainian forces near Donetsk. Read more

Russia, in a daily briefing, said it had taken control of Udy, a village in the eastern region of Kharkiv, which is continuously shelled by Russian forces.

Reuters could not independently verify the Battlefield accounts.

Russia calls its invasion of Ukraine a “special military operation” to demilitarize and “denazify” its smaller neighbor. The war has pushed Moscow-Washington relations to a low point, with Russia warning it could sever ties.

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Reporting by Natalia Zinets in Kyiv, Yoruk Isik and Ece Toksabay in Istanbul, Andrea Shalal in Yuzhne, Maya Gebeily in Beirut and Jonathan Saul in London, and Reuters bureaus; Written by Ingrid Melander and Michael Perry; Editing by William Mallard, Alison Williams and Nick Macfie

Our standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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Russian hackers are stepping up and diversifying their attacks on Ukraine, study finds https://vorotynsk.com/2022/08/12/russian-hackers-are-stepping-up-and-diversifying-their-attacks-on-ukraine-study-finds/ Fri, 12 Aug 2022 17:00:00 +0000 https://vorotynsk.com/2022/08/12/russian-hackers-are-stepping-up-and-diversifying-their-attacks-on-ukraine-study-finds/ As the Russian invasion of Ukraine reaches its sixth month, Russian hackers are stepping up and diversifying their attacks on the country and its citizens, sending mass text messages to Ukrainian civilians threatening their lives if they do not withdraw from at home, trying to rape the country. banks, and even paralyze some of their […]]]>

As the Russian invasion of Ukraine reaches its sixth month, Russian hackers are stepping up and diversifying their attacks on the country and its citizens, sending mass text messages to Ukrainian civilians threatening their lives if they do not withdraw from at home, trying to rape the country. banks, and even paralyze some of their basic public services.

In a presentation at DEF CON 30Kenneth Geers, a security specialist at Very Good Security and a researcher at the NATO Cyber ​​Center, explained how Russia had been planning these actions for years, including through ongoing attacks on power grids and communications systems in the Ukrainian cities.

Russian attacks on Ukraine’s power grid are nothing new, but they have become increasingly frequent as the country tries to flex its digital muscle. The first Kremlin attack was carried out in 2015, blocking part of the national network for six hours. Russian hackers staged another similar attack a year later. This not only punished Ukraine, but also demonstrated Russia’s power in its ability to carry out a cyberattack against another nation. It was just a foreshadowing of the 2022 invasion, during which, before Russia’s major military operations, cyberattacks spiked across the country. Major attacks are now a permanent feature of the war as it drags on, with more 300 documented cyberattacks in and around Ukraine since the start of the conflict in February.

“Troops no longer move without significant pirate support,” Geers told Gizmodo in an interview about his presentation. Specifically, he said, Microsoft noted on Feb. 17 that Russian hackers had been active in the border city of Sumy, targeting critical infrastructure networks ahead of troop movements. These attacks, according to Geers, lasted until March, caused regional power outages, explosions at an electrical substation and explosions at a combined heat and power plant in Sumy, leading to a loss of heat, water and electricity for citizens.

If power outages and heat loss weren’t enough, Russian hackers also sent in Ukrainian troops threatening text messages telling the soldiers “they will find your bodies when the snow melts”. Other posts warned citizens to evacuate their homes, letting them know they would live if they left, or that “no one needs your children to be orphaned”.

A series of Russian DDoS attacks, a method in which hackers flood network servers by taking websites offline, have targeted banks, government websites and ATMs. In the case of ATMs, hackers managed to temporarily take the machines offline, preventing Ukrainians from accessing their money, fomenting panic as citizens sought to flee.

With Russia’s cyber warfare capabilities fully exposed, the question arises: if Russia can carry out attacks like this in Ukraine, can it do so against other nations?

The answer is probably no, according to Geers, at least for now. “Today Russia has its hands full,” he said. “If the NATO/EU alliance stands firm, I doubt Russia has the bandwidth to attack other nations, as the risks currently outweigh the benefits.”

But that hasn’t stopped other nations from worrying about it. Since the start of the war, President Biden has warned that the United States could also fall victim to Russian cyberattacks because of Kremlin sanctions and financial and military support from Ukraine. These threats have yet to materialize, but that doesn’t mean they aren’t looming.

Following the 2015 Russian cyberattack on Ukraine’s power grid, Russian malware was discovered in no less than 10 US utilities, including a nuclear power plant. Is the United States ready for the day one of these attacks strikes?

“As a nation, the United States is ready,” Geers said. “But for individual businesses, the potential damage is immense, at least temporarily.”

Although the US government may believe it is prepared for such an attack, this preparation did not prevent the 2021 Colonial Pipeline hack that cut off fuel supplies to part of the country. The hack, which used a password believed to have been acquired from the dark-web and an outdated security system that was not protected by two-factor authentication, shows that even over the past year a simple phishing scam or an outdated security system leaves everyone behind. country vulnerable to attack. Although this action only targeted the southeast region of the county, a more coordinated attack could bring the country to its knees.

An attack on the US grid could cause blackouts in various parts of the country, and well-targeted attacks could leave millions of people struggling with loss of water, heat or internet access.

While the U.S. government might be preparing for such an attack, carry out exercises and train your own experts to quickly put the grids back online, the case study of the Russian attacks in Ukraine shows that while the government may be prepared for what it needs to do when it happens, American citizens are not. This will no doubt have to change if the future of nation-state attacks continues to escalate in cyber warfare.

“In Ukraine,” Geers said, “we have seen attacks in all areas: military, political, diplomatic, commercial, critical infrastructure, social media, etc. So if nations want to prepare for cyber warfare, they have to educate the whole population.”

Although many experts agree that there is little or nothing your average citizen can do to prevent such attacks, you can prepare for them. Back up your bank statements, important emails and other files to external hard drives outside of cloud networks so you can access them even if the internet goes offline. It also means better educating the general public about phishing email scams, which millions of people fall victim to each year, while keeping your anti-virus and other computer software up to date.

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SUMMARY 5-Ukraine accuses Russia of using nuclear power plant for deadly rocket attack https://vorotynsk.com/2022/08/10/summary-5-ukraine-accuses-russia-of-using-nuclear-power-plant-for-deadly-rocket-attack/ Wed, 10 Aug 2022 17:30:58 +0000 https://vorotynsk.com/2022/08/10/summary-5-ukraine-accuses-russia-of-using-nuclear-power-plant-for-deadly-rocket-attack/ Ukraine on Wednesday accused Russia of exploiting its capture of a nuclear power plant to fire rockets at a nearby town in an attack that left at least 13 people dead and scores injured. The town Ukraine says is targeted by Russia – Marhanets – is one Moscow says its enemies have used in the […]]]>

Ukraine on Wednesday accused Russia of exploiting its capture of a nuclear power plant to fire rockets at a nearby town in an attack that left at least 13 people dead and scores injured. The town Ukraine says is targeted by Russia – Marhanets – is one Moscow says its enemies have used in the past to bomb Russian soldiers at the Zaporizhzhia factory, which they seized in March.

Ukraine and Russia have accused each other of endangering the plant, Europe’s largest nuclear complex, with nearby attacks. After the United Nations atomic energy watchdog sounded the alarm over a potential nuclear disaster, the major industrialized nations of the Group of Seven on Wednesday called on Russia to return the plant to Ukraine .

There is no indication that their request will sway Moscow, which received strong backing from China on Wednesday over its justification for invading Ukraine on February 24. Beijing’s ambassador to Moscow, Zhang Hanhui, has accused Washington of cornering Russia with repeated expansions of the Western-led NATO military alliance and its support for Ukraine’s alignment. on the European Union.

“As the initiator and main instigator of the Ukraine crisis, Washington, while imposing unprecedented comprehensive sanctions on Russia, continues to supply arms and military equipment to Ukraine,” Zhang said. “Their ultimate goal is to wear down and crush Russia with protracted war and the cudgel of sanctions.”

Beijing is also embroiled in a standoff with the United States over Taiwan: China has been conducting huge military exercises around the self-governing island it claims as its own since the US House Speaker’s visit. United, Nancy Pelosi. Russia has not commented on Ukrainian allegations of an attack on Marhanets and Reuters could not independently verify Kyiv’s version. Moscow says it is not deliberately targeting civilians in what it calls its “special military operation” aimed at safeguarding its security against NATO expansion.

Ukraine and the West accuse Moscow of waging an imperial-style war of aggression without provocation. NEW RUSSIAN GROUND FORCE?

Andriy Yermak, chief of staff to President Volodymyr Zelenskiy, said Russia was launching attacks with impunity from Zaporizhzhia, knowing it was risky for Ukraine to retaliate. “Russian cowards can’t do anything more so they are hitting towns that are vilely hiding at the Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant,” he said on social media.

According to Ukraine, about 500 Russian soldiers equipped with heavy vehicles and weapons are at the plant, where Ukrainian technicians continue to work. Ukraine’s nuclear energy company warned containers with radioactive material could be bombed and said it was vital that Kyiv resumed the plant by winter. She accuses Russia of wanting to connect the facility to its power grid.

Russia says its forces are behaving responsibly and ensuring the security of the complex. Valentyn Reznychenko, governor of Ukraine’s central Dnipropetrovsk region, said on Wednesday that the Russian attack on Marhanets was carried out with 80 Grad rockets.

More than 20 buildings were damaged in the city across the Dnipro River from the power station, he said. Footage provided by Ukrainian officials showed the rubble-strewn hallway of a school whose windows had been blown out and a residential building pierced by a rocket.

The war has crushed Ukraine’s economy, but there was some relief on Wednesday when foreign creditors backed Kyiv’s demand for a two-year freeze on payments on nearly $20 billion in international bonds. This should avoid a messy default. Ukraine said it would save about $5 billion in managing its dwindling financial resources.

“The two-year debt freeze makes sense because even if the war ends soon, Ukraine’s situation is not going to improve overnight,” said Stuart Culverhouse, chief economist at the firm. London studies Tellimer. “Creditors were even surprised that the country decided to be up to date on obligations so far.” In another rare positive for Ukraine, the United Nations said it expected to see a surge in requests from ships to export its grain under a mediated deal designed to unblock exports and mitigate global shortages and price spikes.

Britain, which is helping Ukraine with arms, intelligence and training, said Wednesday it believed Russia had “almost certainly” established a major new ground force to support its war. The new 3rd Army Corps was based in the town of Mulino, east of Moscow, the British Ministry of Defense said in an intelligence bulletin. However, Russia would struggle to build up the necessary manpower and the new force is unlikely to influence the war, he added.

(This story has not been edited by the Devdiscourse team and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

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